Currency wars: The rise of bitcoin - Opinion - The Jakarta ...

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Survey: Investors Likely to Flow Back to Gold; China Blockchain Euphoria Fading

Survey: Investors Likely to Flow Back to Gold; China Blockchain Euphoria Fading
According to a recent Twitter survey, Bitcoin investors are likely to turn to gold as the cryptocurrency’s most recent hype fizzles out, leaving losses in its wake. The poll, conducted by Novem Gold, reveals the extent of the disillusionment among BTC enthusiasts as prices remain largely suppressed in H2 2019.
This slump, however, is most alarming because it closely follows the sharp gains the coin had enjoyed after optimistic comments from the Chinese head of state regarding blockchain in October. The speech, widely regarded as a watershed moment for the cryptocurrency, could prove pivotal for Bitcoin and the crypto world. China’s massive population can single-handedly send the coin’s Bull Run back on track.
In his speech, Chinese President Xi Jinping referred to blockchain as “ an important breakthrough.” Before the statement, the prevailing sentiment was that the Chinese government was anti-blockchain. The primary signal came after its September 2017 banning of initial coin offerings (ICOs). The speech was therefore interpreted as a green light indicating that China was willing to embrace cryptocurrency trading in all its aspects, which would push Bitcoin prices once more to the moon.
China, for many years, has been the epicenter of blockchain and cryptocurrency activity. Before a large number of investors in other parts of the world grew accustomed to Bitcoin, China had already established itself as a mining hub. The East Asian nation has significantly contributed in many ways to the rise of the digital currency sector over the years.
As an illustration, as of 2017 the country’s insatiable need for crypto assets was almost 90% of crypto’s total global trading volumes. Shockingly, just a few months into 2018, this demand dipped below the 1% mark. This decline in demand also followed Bitcoin’s most significant price dip, which saw it go from a high of $19,800 to a low of $6,200 each in less than two months.

China is Pro Blockchain

The excitement over the Xi Jinping speech was therefore palpable in October when he said that his country would “seize the opportunity” that blockchain offers in research, standardization, and development. The Chinese President is the first leader of a global economic giant to make such friendly remarks towards a technology that is maligned by some of his peers.
If the government embraces cryptocurrencies, Chinese Bitcoin bulls would return and push prices through the roof. Following the unexpected speech, the price of Bitcoin temporarily surged, adding 40% after rallying to a high of $9,526 on November 4th.
Unfortunately, the rise halted and a consistent correction happened, lowering the value of the token to a $6,524 mark on November 25th, a much lower price than before the Xi effect. Bitcoin has, however, recouped some of its losses over the last few days, but it is still trading at half the price in comparison to June 2019.
The Chinese, in contrast to many other countries, have many advantages when it comes to cryptocurrency awareness. They have, for instance, long been aware of the virtues of speculation into new asset types. They are also more aware of virtual currencies and have, over time, developed cautionary optimism for digital currency regulation.
Tencent QQ’s reward program, for example, paid out in Q coins and had more than 221.4 million active users by 2006. Consequently, some of the earliest BTC adopters were Chinese. Bitcoin’s popularity in China also increased with the East Asian country’s rise to the position of the second most powerful economy on earth.
China’s 12-th strategic economic plan, released in 2011, was one of many development aspects aimed at the reduction of the poverty rampant in the nation’s rural zones. As a result of the economic success of this plan, China’s emerging middle class burst onto the scene, increasing the country’s domestic consumption from a low of 4% in 2000 to a high of 68% in 2012.
The money that was left over after savings were taken care of was channeled into speculative investing. Since this aspect of making money is a big part of the investment culture of the Chinese, the country’s investors took a quick liking to Bitcoin.
The Chinese, however, were not purchasing the digital asset for its privacy attributes but rather for its investment appeal. Unlike many Bitcoin enthusiasts in the West who love the digital currency for its P2P features, the Chinese adopted BT for its Gold 2.0 features. Speculating in gold is an investment activity most Chinese are accustomed to.
This difference is the reason why, when the Silk Road closed down, the Chinese market for crypto was hardly affected. In the West, however, the closure of the online black-market platform adversely affected Bitcoin prices.

BTC was Gold 2.0 to China

The interest in BTC investment in China rose even further with the loosening of the government’s tight grip on financial markets. At the time, Beijing was in the process of developing diverse financial markets for the new elite to invest in, such as derivatives. A strengthening economy with friendly regulations was just what the Bitcoin investment frenzy required.
With the creation of BTC mining hardware in 2013, the participation of the Chinese as miners and investors soared. New 2016 to 2017 crypto regulations, however, brought the Chinese crypto trading market to its knees because they quashed the ability to speculate in Gold 2.0.
Despite the death of crypto speculative trading, the Chinese crypto community is still very vibrant despite the stringent regulations around it. This resilience is especially visible in the area of blockchain application.
Such innovation is what the Xi Jinping government is promising to support, not decentralized cryptocurrencies that make it difficult for governments to control money as they wish. Since the pro-blockchain October speech, there has been a cascade of activity in the Chinese blockchain scene.
The Chinese central bank is, for instance, readying itself to release its Digital Currency Electronic Payment System. The People’s Bank of China intends to replace the use of fiat with the DCEP blockchain-based payments solution. This move would make the country the first major world economy to embrace a native digital currency.
With the launch of the digital payment systems, China would find it much easier to extend the influence of its monetary policy to the rest of the world. While Beijing has no regard for “censorship-resistant” and permission-less digital currencies — as they endanger capital controls — it is building its centralized digital currency to supplant Bitcoin.
This effort is a true testament to Bitcoin’s significance and the Chinese government’s appreciation that the world’s monetary system is dependent on technological advancements. Unlike the West, China has harnessed the power of internet connectivity without losing its control over freedom of expression. The economic giant is now strategizing ways that it can harness the power of blockchain, albeit minus its decentralized aspects.
It could be that the Chinese government’s interest in the blockchain is part of the drive to end the age of the USD. This is an opportunity to move the country past its dependence on US-owned foundational technologies. According to Xi China, through blockchain, will “take the leading position … occupy the commanding heights of innovation, and gain new industrial advantages.”
China, however, is determined to make its cryptocurrency more acceptable to the international and domestic markets than Bitcoin has ever been. The second-largest economy has been amassing massive amounts of gold, which analysts say will back its native digital currency.
A gold-backed digital currency is acceptable in any part of the world and will significantly enhance Beijing’s de-dollarization policy. It is therefore expected that the county will maintain its leading gold mining and buying positions in 2020, which should add more fuel to the ongoing global gold rally.
https://preview.redd.it/nc1l1mlcyq741.png?width=1200&format=png&auto=webp&s=3ea7c308c3e2e226d8eced72adabefba70d49a80
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Vitalik Keeps Saying It. A lot of others say it too. Let's Get Real. Crypto and Blockchain Has a Major Problem Problem We Need to Address Immediately. Here's How I Think We'll Do It.

Vitalik Keeps Saying It. A lot of others say it too. Let's Get Real. Crypto and Blockchain Has a Major Problem Problem We Need to Address Immediately. Here's How I Think We'll Do It.

Let's get real. [Vitalik talks about this constantly]. The cryptocurrency/blockchain community has a cultural problem.

Edit: Links here suck. I put quotes around them so you can spot them out. I did a lot of research for this post.
Edit #2: Put square brackets around links. Now they should be clearly visible.
TLDR: The ills Vitalik talks about are primarily about psychology. New scalable solutions can fix it partially, but we have to deal with people first.
Before I dig deep into this post, I want to let you know what it's about. Yes, you'll see some emotional content. You'll see ideological ideas. However, this post ain't about ideologies. It's about something I deem as a real problem. Its about the corrupt mindsets that we have as community since the prices spiked early 2017. To advance forward, I want to analyze them, distill the problem into the most basic form possible, then point people into a direction I deem would be good for the cryptocurrency community. The format will go like this:
  1. My history with Crypto/Blockchain. Why I'm here in the first place.
  2. My analysis of the problem Vitalik talked about
  3. My perceived solution to the problem.
  4. The steps I've already taken towards the problem

Why I'm Here

Time travel back into pre-2017 and you'll see that the cryptocurrency/blockchain community was filled with hopeful young nerds that dreamed of making the world into a better place; A much more open, peaceful and freer place. I was going through a hard time with my life 2015-16 -- my twin died, I was on the verge of going homeless with nobody else to rely on, had to go unbanked in America, almost entirely dropped out of college and my first contracting business failed. I couldn't get my life right at all, and I didn't see any hope. The future was bleak to me. However, I found people here in the blockchain community actually trying their hardest to do things that would solve the world's problems, [even if that was mainly reporting the news for people and addressing people live in chat to create a community]. That drew me in well before the price of cryptocurrencies spiked; almost in a manic like way -- I read about it constantly, practiced solidity, talked to everyone I could that would have the capacity to understand cryptocurrencies and more.
Even now, when I attend conferences, I meet good-hearted, sleep deprived developers, marketers, business owners and specialist that aim to solve the world's greatest problems in the best ways they can. Many are in small corners of the world helping each other out. Inside of this community I found hope and meaning. My depression lifted, my anxiety went away, my life got back on track, and that hope propels me though the field years since I joined this movement. I'm now more confident than ever knowing that collectively this industry will possibly be the epicenter of change for not only money, but for everything. We'll [eliminate poverty], [solve global warming], [prevent hyper-inflation like we've seen with Venezuela], [improve supply chains] around the world, improve healthcare, and solve the [social ills of the world like corruption]. That's just the tip of the iceberg. I believe intensely in the vision set for crypto.
The community is filled with brilliant people that will make a difference. That excites me.
I'm for freedom, boosting happiness of individuals, increasing health, making life more fun and less stressful for the common person, open discussions to progress everyone forward, and a more livable planet. I'm thinking of all people and I'm not against any group. However, I'm not for FUD, greed while abusing others, bigotry, trolling, hatred, racism, evil acts and stealing. Those are against my values. I think that's against the values of many of the cryptocurrency community's foundational members.

A problem we can't ignore

In 2017, as the prices exploded and the returns grew in for the average person, I noticed the community was starting to get tainted. People were no longer focusing on technology, freedom and community. No longer focusing on creating better lives for people in their communities around the world. We were missing the altruism I originally felt in the community. [If I were in Vitalik shoes, where I'd invest 80-100 hours a week into a vision, I'd feel extreme frustration too]. People are instead focusing on [needless politics], searching for the next big price pump, the next big score. Instead of people figuring out about how to use blockchain and crypto for making people's lives better, I've heard people say HODL and scam more than I ever have in the history of the community. This saddens me and frustrates me at the same time. On one end I see great potential and beauty in the community, and at the same time I see the beast within us come out that hasn't been even thought about deeply enough to be accurately tamed. Trolls, profiteers running away with ICO money, market manipulators and scam artist ruining the reputation and progress of the community.
While I could complain about what I see, I decided to instead dissect it in this post. I wanted to know what's causing this on a larger scale. See, by training I'm a psychologist, social scientist and computer scientist. I've been transitioning over to economics and data science because I feel it's a solid cornerstone of the industry. My perspective will be coming from those first. Allow me to explain. If our community is going to "grow up and actually solve problems", the corruption of minds because of money needs to be fully explored first.
Only by understanding the problem thoroughly can we solve it.
Explicitly stating the problem: Its the extreme predatory, egotistical, harsh behavior we as a community have adopted.

The Psychology And Behavioral Science Of Finance

Let's start with the biggest premise. Money is an idea. It exist because people communicate, produce, share, trade, have scarcity for goods and have needs. Money is an ideological binding agent for people.
  • It helps us exchange two irrelevant things with a medium
  • Helps us do more things in knowing the value we hold will help us improve productivity in the future
  • Helps us determine value in an abstract way
  • Helps us navigate the world.
Money is about as social and psychological as anything in the world can get outside of direct human interactions. Coincidentally, this psychological/social aspect isn't talked about very much inside of the cryptocurrency landscape. However, it's the foundation of everything we have here today. If we can't talk about how money is connected to the mind, we can't solve the maturity problem Vitalik was talking about. My intent is to explore that deeply so a firm direction can be at least set.

Money and the Mind

Our mind is complex. Beyond the usual processing of information people have (our 11 senses), we people have 2 primary centers for decision making and control.
Limbic System
The first one is the limbic system. It has gone by the nickname of "the lizard brain" in recent history. It's responsible for storing memories, handling stress responses, attention and emotional processing. In a sense, it controls all of intuition and fast heuristic choices you make.
https://preview.redd.it/xvpw95ate8d11.png?width=551&format=png&auto=webp&s=eeed7e25448614af346091f6ededac41be9df5b5
Prefrontal Cortex
The second system is known as the prefrontal cortex. It controls higher order functions such as planning, reasoning, serial processing and how we think about emotions.
https://preview.redd.it/if5p4n90f8d11.png?width=512&format=png&auto=webp&s=92ef641c4f583d38239cdf380d443b2b7557767e
These two centers are not mutually exclusive. You brain has circuits to make decisions about everything. The two parts talk to each other to do so. Any dysfunction in behavior is usually due to a lack of communication between these two decision centers, rather than a lack of communication between the centers of your brain. This is heavily seen in mental disorders. According to the book [Upward Spiral ], a book that looks at mental disorders from a neuroscientific view and explains how to reverse the ill effects of them, here's now some disorders can play out inside of our heads:
  1. Depression -- A poor link between the Anterior Cingular Cortex and PFC. It means you will notice more negative and therefore act on negative impulses and thoughts.
  2. Dissociation -- A poor link between the Anterior Cingular Cortex and Anterior Insular makes it so your attention can't be accurately directed towards yourself. There will likely be a poor understanding of pain and out of body experiences. It can be reversed with meditation and yoga.

How Crypto Fits

This should hopefully be the first question we have. It's easy to only pay attention to the ill behaviors of the more recent cryptocurrency industry and say "shame on you!". But what if people had a hard time actually controlling themselves? Inside of the book Upward Spiral, Alex Korb, the neuroscientist that wrote it explored that people with depression and anxiety had a hard time not being depressed and anxious by choice. Because the depressed person's circuitry is skewed, they act on it subconsciously in a forever perpetuating loop. In fact, the only way to reverse depression is to reverse the circuitry that holds it together.
Part of what makes anti-depressants more effective is that the serotonin improves sleep and makes a person's brain more susceptible to positive changes. That would be doing things like doing gratitude journals everyday to make your anterior cingular cortices notice more positive events, being around people who love you to boost your serotonin and cut down stress hormones, or getting a little exercise everyday to send oxygen to your brain.
So that leads us back to the original question. What if people didn't have a fully conscious control over how they acted about money and crypto? I did some research between many different articles and found that this was absolutely the case. People don't have much control. They tend to be on extremes of some end all the time.
How Does Finance Play With The Brain?
Of the many ways, there's one key way it does. Money plays with people through the the hypothalamus stress response. It charges people into fight or flight mode, and can literally destabilize the homeostatic systems. This can do all sorts of things. It can make the anterior cingulate weaker in strength (known to help us control emotions and learn), and therefore reduce the power of our prefrontal cortex. When people are stressed about finance, or even excited about it, it will put people into extreme states. [Meaning the lizard brain takes the show]. That can make people easily make haphazard decisions.
Of course, there's other things that happen with the introduction of more money, but that IS the most intense thing to take note of.
If we want to solve the problem of relinquishing poor community, like Vitalik continuously makes comments about, we need to look at the problem in this way. If we don't see it this way, we're screwed. The problem wont be solved, companies like Microsoft will continuously kill off their implementations due to price fluctuations, the cryptocurrency community wont pass go and wont make a huge impact. Instead we'll blame, shout at each other, and create another Wall Street 2.0. In fact, we'll become worse than them. We will have more leverage over resources than any other group in history and the corruption will be strong.
Money affects decisions, period.

Solving the Cultural problem

I'm nervous. As I type this response, I know that by revealing my idea to the public I could be condemned by the community for "shilling", and even worse, somebody else can pick it up and run with it. That is the most nerve wreaking thing I could ever consider. Months of 80 hour weeks and extreme sacrifices to bring out a vision because I didn't see much of a choice. If we don't remove what limits us soon as a community we will get engulfed by outsiders that don't want to create virtuous society.
My solution: Algorithmic Trading
Now, before you tell me that the market is entirely unpredictable, I'd like to be one to say that the notion is false. We see everywhere that people using AI and more complex forms of math to be able to make reasonable gains in the financial world. Companies like Bridgewater predicted the financial crash of 2008 with reasonable accuracy, and other people like [mathematicians are able to do the same]. Realistically, the market has some degree of predictability. However, much of the access to that is limited.
Even beyond that, the financial industry is one of the only social fields that is highly transparent to many actors, through the news and price information, and reflects ideas and beliefs through the markets. If we can better analyze markets, we could discover all sorts of social phenomenon that previously made no sense. With algorithmic trading we're heavily incentivized to learn, as that will produce a direct outcome of earning money.
We could better solve the social ills of the world quickly and efficiently over time. On top of that, we will be able to stabilize the market and protect against bad agents if algorithmic trading becomes coordinated and effective enough throughout the industry.
Again, How Does it Fit With Cryptocurrency?
Bitconnect could answer how automated trading fits.
Before I continue, let me be clear. People lost their money through that scam. It was awful. I know some people that had a lot of money taken from them. Many of them are now fearful of cryptocurrency.
However, I don't think Bitconnect was 100% wrong with their idea. Yes they were a ponzi scheme, yet realistically many of the people I met that fell for it felt as though the crypto markets were already complex. They were losing money while HODLing, making rash decisions and trading.
Bitcoin and the entire industry carries too much of a cognitive burden for a person to keep track of beyond their normal everyday life. News, prices, scams, hacks and technical information. That's a lot to keep track of if you have 3-4 part-time jobs as a single mom or dad while raising 2 kids. That's a lot to keep track of if you're old and don't have the technical capacity to read into the crypto markets all day everyday.
Therefore, even while people were making less money from investing into Bitconnect, on paper it required less thinking and they were still getting benefits that they cared about. They could share with friends because they thought that there money would not shrink in value heavily due to a random market crash. As a consumer, it isn't wrong to believe that you can be apart of something big without having to work an extra 5 hours everyday reading blogs and watching youtube videos just to keep up with the happenings of the industry.
It doesn't require us to be judging people for falling into a ponzi scheme. It requires a bit of caring and empathy to see people's main intentions. They want a better life compared to the one that has been crushing them with student debt and poor job prospects. People want to have a better life without being as stressed beyond belief like they currently are.
And for the everyday trader, giving them the incentive they seek, while giving them the capacity to do some research for themselves is important. Choice matters a lot for some people.

Steps I've taken towards this:

Here comes the shill part you've been waiting for. Over the last year I've been building an application that would help us solve the problems we face today as a community. It I'll reduce the stress response of people worrying more about money, with technology like it getting standardized throughout the entire industry, it'll make things a lot more stable. It's an automated AI-based trading platform that aims to make reduce the cognitive load and worry about holding your funds in crypto. The aim of it is to dynamically trade for people while also letting them have 100% control over their funds. For now, that's by using exchange API keys. Though in the future, that can be through decentralized exchanges, meaning no middle man.
My product's name: It's [Funguana.com]. [Internally meaning the interconnection of all Dhrama in the Huayan Buddhist religion].
I've already received controversial reviews, and feel crazy for putting it back out there. However, I'm now confident I can follow through, and maybe by explaining my reasoning behind why I built it the community will respond differently this time.
To make it more trust-able, 4 months after public release, if my resources allow me to, I plan to open source the infrastructure code so people can implement their own platform within a matter of weeks, then systemically open many of the algorithms so they can appropriate powerful algorithms together over time (many not based on AI). I have to be strategic though. If I open it too soon, too many bad actors can enter the space and cause havoc early, without much chance to keep them in check.
Edit: I made changes to the page to make the links more obvious. Now they're in bold and italic
Edit 2: Adding quotes to make links more obvious again.
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Bitcoin Mining Profitability: How Long Does it Take to Mine One Bitcoin in 2019?

When it comes to Bitcoin (BTC) mining, the major questions on people’s minds are “how profitable is Bitcoin mining” and “how long would it take to mine one Bitcoin?” To answer these questions, we need to take an in-depth look at the current state of the Bitcoin mining industry — and how it has changed — over the last several years.
Bitcoin mining is, essentially, the process of participating in Bitcoin’s underlying security mechanism — known as proof-of-work — to help secure the Bitcoin blockchain. In return, participants receive compensation in bitcoins (BTC).
When you participate in Bitcoin mining, you are essentially searching for blocks by crunching complex cryptographic challenges using your mining hardware. Once a block is discovered, new transactions are recorded and verified within the block and the block discoverer receives the block rewards — currently set at 12.5 BTC — as well as the transactions fees for the transactions included within the block.
Once the maximum supply of 21 million Bitcoins has been mined, no further Bitcoins will ever come into existence. This property makes Bitcoin deflationary, something which many argue will inevitably increase the value of each Bitcoin unit as it becomes more scarce due to increased global adoption.
The limited supply of Bitcoin is also one of the reasons why Bitcoin mining has become so popular. In previous years, Bitcoin mining proved to be a lucrative investment option — netting miners with several fold returns on their investment with relatively little effort.
bitcoin mining hardware
Mining Hardware
The mining hardware you choose will mostly depend on your circumstances — in terms of budget, location and electricity costs. Since the amount of hashing power you can dedicate to the mining process is directly correlated with how much Bitcoin you will mine per day, it is wise to ensure your hardware is still competitive in 2019.
Bitcoin uses SHA256 as its mining algorithm. Because of this, only hardware compatible with this algorithm can be used to mine Bitcoin. Although it is technically possible to mine Bitcoin on your current computer hardware — using your CPU or GPU — this will almost certainly not generate a positive return on your investment and you may end up damaging your device.
The most cost-effective way to mine Bitcoin in 2019 is using application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) mining hardware. These are specially-designed machines that offer much higher performance per watt than typical computers and have been an absolutely essential purchase for anybody looking to get into Bitcoin mining since the first Avalon ASICs were shipped in 2013.
When it comes to selecting Bitcoin mining hardware, there are several main parameters to consider — though the importance of each of these may vary based on personal circumstances and budget.
Performance per Watt
When it comes to Bitcoin mining, performance per watt is a measure of how many gigahashes per watt a machine is capable of and is, hence, a simple measure of its efficiency. Since electricity costs are likely to be one of the largest expenses when mining Bitcoin, it is usually a good idea to ensure that you are getting good performance per watt out of your hardware.
Ideally, your mining hardware would be highly efficient, allowing it to mine Bitcoin with lower energy requirements — though this will need to be balanced with acquisition costs, as often the most efficient hardware is also the most expensive. This means it may take longer to see a return on investment.
In countries with cheap electricity, performance per watt is often less of a concern than acquisition costs and price-performance ratio. In most countries, operating outdated mining hardware is typically cost prohibitive, as energy costs outweigh the income generated by the mining equipment.
However, this may not be the case for those operating in countries with extremely cheap electricity — such as Kuwait and Venezuela — as even older equipment can still be profitable. Similarly, miners with a free energy surplus, such as from wind or solar electric generators, can benefit from the minimal gains offered by still running outdated hardware.
Longevity
The lifetime of mining hardware also plays a critical role in determining how profitable your mining venture will be. It’s always a good idea to do whatever possible to ensure it runs as smoothly as possible.
Since mining equipment tends to run at a full (or almost full) load for extended periods, they also tend to break down and fail more frequently than most electronics — which can seriously damage your profitability. Equipment failure is even more common when purchasing second-hand equipment. Since warranty claims are often challenging, it can often take a long time to receive a warranty replacement.
Price-Performance Ratio
In many cases, one of the major criteria used to select mining hardware is the price-performance ratio — a measure of how much performance a machine outputs per unit price. In the case of cryptocurrency mining hardware, this is commonly expressed as gigahashes per dollar or GH/$.
Under ideal circumstances, the mining hardware would have a high price-performance ratio, ensuring you get a lot of bang for your buck. However, this must also be considered in combination with the acquisition costs and the expected lifetime of the machine — since the absolute most powerful machines are not always the cheapest or the most energy efficient.
Acquisition Costs
Acquisition costs are almost always the biggest barrier to entry for most Bitcoin miners since most top-end mining hardware costs several thousand dollars. This problem is further compounded by the fact that many hardware manufacturers offer discounts for bulk purchases, allowing those with deeper pockets to achieve a better price-performance ratio.
Acquisition costs include all the costs involved in purchasing any mining equipment, including hardware costs, shipping costs, import duties, and any further costs. For example, many ASIC miners do not include a power supply — which can be another considerable expense, since the 1,000W+ power supplies usually required tend to cost several hundred dollars alone.
Ensuring your equipment runs smoothly can also add in additional costs, such as cooling and maintenance expenses. In addition, some miners may want to invest in uninterruptible power supplies to ensure their hardware keeps running — even if the power fails temporarily.
asic mining
Current Generation Hardware
One of the most recent additions to the Bitcoin mining hardware market is the Ebang Ebit E11++, which was released in October 2018. Using a 10nm fabrication process for its processors, the Ebit E11++ is able to achieve one of the highest hash rates on the market at 44TH/s.
In terms of efficiency, the Ebang Ebit E11++ is arguably the best on the market, offering 44TH/s of hash rate while drawing just 1,980W of power, offering 22.2GH/W performance. However, as of writing, the Ebang Ebit E11++ is out of stock until March 31, 2019 — while its price of $2,024 (excluding shipping) may make it prohibitively expensive for those first getting involved with Bitcoin mining.
Another popular choice is the ASICminer 8 Nano, a machine released in October 2018 that offers 44TH/s for $3,900 excluding shipping. The ASICminer 8 Nano draws 2,100W of power, giving it an efficiency of almost 21GH/W — slightly lower than the Ebit E11++ while costing almost double the price. However, unlike the E11++, the 8 Nano is actually in stock and available to purchase.
ASICminer also offers the 8 Nano Pro, a machine launched in mid-2018 that offers 80 TH/s of hash rate for $9,500 (excluding shipping). However, unlike the Ebit E11++ and 8 Nano, the minimum order quantity for the 8 Nano Pro is curiously set at five, meaning you will need to lay out a minimum of $47,500 in order to actually get your hands on one (or five).
While the 8 Nano Pro doesn’t offer the same performance per watt as the Ebit E11+ or AICMiner 8 Nano, it is one of the quieter miners on this list, making it more suitable for a home or office environment. That being said, the ASICminer 8 Nano Pro is easily the most expensive miner per TH on this list — costing a whopping $118.75/TH, compared to the $46/TH offered by the E11++ and $88.64 offered by the 8 Nano.
The latest hardware on this list is the Innosilicon T3 43T, which is currently available for pre-order at $2,279, and estimated to ship in March 2019. Offering 43TH/s of performance at 2,100W, the T3 43T comes in at an efficiency of 20.4GH/W, which is around 10 percent less energy efficient than the Ebit E11++.
The T3 43T also has a minimum order quantity of three units, making the minimum acquisition cost $6837 + shipping for preorders. All in all, the T3 43T is more costly and less efficient than the E11++ but may arrive slightly earlier since Ebang will not ship the E11++ units until at least end March 29, 2019.
Finally, this list would not be complete without including Bitmain’s latest offering, the Antminer S15-28TH/s, which — as its name suggests — offers 28TH/s of hash power while drawing just under 1600W at the wall. The Antminer S15 is one of the only SHA256 miners to use 7nm processors, making it somewhat smaller than some of the other devices on this list.
Like most pieces of top-end Bitcoin mining hardware, the Antminer S15 27TH/s model is currently sold out, with current orders not shipping until mid-February 2019. However, the S15 is offered at a significantly lower price than many of its competitors at just $1020 (excluding shipping), with no minimum quantity restriction. At these rates, the Antminer comes in at just $37.78/TH — though its energy efficiency is a much less impressive 17.5GH/W.
Mining Hardware Mining Hardware Comparison
Performance (GH/W) Price Performance Ratio ($/TH)
Ebang Ebit E11++ 22.2GH/W $46/TH
ASICminer 8 Nano 21GH/W $88.64/TH
ASICminer 8 Nano Pro 19GH/W $118.75/TH
Innosilicon T3 43T 20.4GH/W $53/TH
Antminer S15-28TH/s 17.5GH/W $37.78/TH
How To Select a Good Mining Pool
Mining pools are platforms that allow miners to pool their resources together to achieve a higher collective hash rate — which, in turn, allows the collective to mine more blocks than they would be able to achieve alone.
Typically, these mining pools will distribute block rewards to contributing miners based on the proportion of the hash rate they supply. If a pool contributing a total of 20 TH/s of hash rate successfully mines the next block, a user responsible for 10 percent of this hash rate will receive 10 percent of the 12.5 BTC reward.
Pools essentially allow smaller miners to compete with large private mining organizations by ensuring that the collective hash rate is high enough to successfully mine blocks on regular basis. Without operating through a mining pool, many miners would be unlikely to discover any blocks at all — due to only contributing a tiny fraction of the overall Bitcoin hash rate.
While it is quite possible to be successful mining without a pool, this typically requires an extremely large mining operation and is usually not recommended — unless you have enough hash rate to mine blocks on a regular basis.
Although it is technically possible to discover blocks mining solo and keep the entire 12.5 BTC reward for yourself, the odds of this actually occurring are practically zero — making pool collaboration practically the only way to compete in 2019 and beyond.
Selecting the best pool for you can be a challenging job since the vast majority of pools are quite similar and offer similar features and comparable fees. Because of this, we have broken down the qualities you should be looking for in a new pool into four categories; reputation, hash rate, pool fees, and usability/features:
Reputation
The reputation of a pool is one of the most important factors in selecting the pool that is best for you. Well-reputed pools will tend to be much larger than newer or less well-established pools since few pools with a poor reputation can stand the test of time.
Well-reputed pools also tend to be more transparent about their operation, many of which provide tools to ensure that each user is getting the correct reward based on the hash rate contributed. By using only pools with a great reputation, you also ensure your hash rate is not being used for nefarious purposes — such as powering a 51 percent attack.
When comparing a list of pools that appear suitable for you, it is a wise move to read their user reviews before making your choice — ensuring you don’t end up mining at a pool that steals your hard-fought earnings.
Hash Rate
When it comes to mining Bitcoin, the probability of discovering the next block is directly related to the amount of hashing power you contribute to the network. Because of this, one of the major features you should be considering when selecting your pool is its total hash rate — which is often closely related to the proportion of new blocks mined by the pool
Since the total hash rate of a pool is directly related to how quickly it discovers new blocks, this means the largest pools tend to discover a relative majority of blocks — leading to more regular rewards. However, the very largest pools also tend the have higher fees but often make up for this with sheer success and additional features.
Sometimes, some of the largest pools have a minimum hash rate requirement ù leaving some of the smaller miners left out of the loop. Although smaller pools typically have more relaxed requirements with reduced performance thresholds, these pools may be only slightly more profitable than mining solo.
Pool Fees
When choosing a suitable pool, typically one of the major considerations is its fees. Typically, most pools will charge a small fee that is deducted from your earnings and is usually around 1-2 percent — but sometimes slightly lower or higher.
There are also pools that offer 0 percent fees. However, these are often much smaller than the major pools and tend to make their money in a different way — such as through monthly subscriptions or donations.
Ideally, you will choose the pool that offers the best balance of fees to other features. Usually, the pool with the absolute lowest fees is not the best choice. Additionally, pools with the lowest fees often have the highest withdrawal minimums — making pool hopping uneconomical for most.
Usability and Features
When first starting out with Bitcoin mining, learning how to set up a pool and navigating through the settings can be a challenge. Because of this, several pools target their services to newer users by offering a simple to navigate user interface and providing detailed learning resources and prompt customer support.
However, for more experienced miners, simple pools don’t tend to offer a variety of features needed to maximize profitability. For example, although many mining pools focus their entire hash rate towards mining a single cryptocurrency, some are large enough to offer additional options — allowing users to mine other SHA256 coins such as Bitcoin Cash (BCH) or Fantom if they choose.
These pools are technically more challenging to use and mostly designed for those familiar with mining, happy to hop from coin to coin mining whichever is most profitable at the time. There are even some exchanges that automatically direct their combined hash rate at the most profitable cryptocurrency — taking the guesswork out of the equation.
bitcoin mining pool
Best Mining Pools for 2019
The Bitcoin mining pool industry has a large number of players, but the vast majority of the Bitcoin hash rate is concentrated within just a few pools. Currently, there are dozens of suitable pools to choose from — but we have selected just a few of the best to help get you started on your journey.
Slushpool was the first Bitcoin mining pool released, being launched way back in 2010 under the name “Bitcoin Pooled Mining Server.” Since then, Slushpool has grown into one of the most popular pools around — currently accounting for just under 10 percent of the total Bitcoin hash rate.
Although Slushpool isn’t one of the very largest pools, it does offer a newbie-friendly interface alongside more advanced features for those that need them. The pool has moderately high fees of 2 percent but offers servers in several countries — including the U.S., Europe, China, and Japan — giving it a good balance of fees to features.
BTC.com is another potential candidate for your pool and currently stands as the largest public Bitcoin mining pool. It is responsible for mining around 17 percent of new blocks. Being the largest public mining pool provides users with a sense of security, ensuring blocks are mined regularly and a stable income is made.
Image courtesy of Blockchain.info.
BTC.com is owned by Bitmain, a company that manufacturers mining hardware, and charges a 1.5 percent fees — placing it squarely in the middle-tier in terms of fees. Unlike other platforms, BTC.com uses its own payment structure known as FPPS (Full Pay Per Share), which means miners also receive a share of the transaction fees included within mined blocks — making it slightly more profitable than standard payment per share (PPS) pools.
Another great option is Antpool, a mining pool that supports mining services for 10 different cryptocurrencies, including Bitcoin, Litecoin (LTC) and Ethereum (ETH). AntPool frequently trades places with BTC.com as the largest Bitcoin mining pool. However, as of this writing, it occupies the title of the third-largest public mining pool.
What sets Antpool apart from other pools is the ability to choose your own fee system — including PPS, PPS+, and PPLNS. If you choose PPLNS, using Antpool is free but you will not receive any transaction fees from any blocks mined. Antpool also offers regular payouts and has a low minimum payout of just 0.001 BTC, making it suitable for smaller miners.
Last on the list of the best Bitcoin mining pools in 2019 is the Bitcoin.com mining pool. Although this is one of the smaller pools available, the Bitcoin.com pool has some redeeming features that make it worth a look. It offers mining contracts, allowing you to test out Bitcoin mining before investing in mining equipment of your own. According to Bitcoin.com, they are the highest paying Pay Per Share (PPS) pool in the world, offering up to 98 percent block rewards as well as automatic switching between BTC and BCH mining to optimize profitability.

Electricity Costs
While your mining hardware is most important when it comes to how much BTC you can earn when mining, your electricity costs are usually the largest additional expense. With electricity costs often varying dramatically between countries, ensuring you are on the best cost-per-KWh plan available will help to keep costs down when mining.
Most commonly, large mining operations will be set up in countries where electricity costs are the lowest — such as Iceland, India, and Ukraine. Since China has one of the lowest energy costs in the world, it was previously the epicenter of Bitcoin mining. However, since the government began cracking down on cryptocurrencies, it has largely fallen out of favor with miners.
Technically, Venezuela is one of the cheapest countries in the world in terms of electricity, with the government heavily subsidizing these energy costs — while Bitcoin offers an escape from the hyperinflation suffered by the Venezuelan bolivar. Despite this, importing mining hardware into the country is a costly endeavor, making it impractical for many people.
Finding ways to lower your electricity costs is one of the best ways to improve your mining profitability. This can include investing in renewable energy sources such as solar, geothermal, or wind — which can yield increased profitability over the long term.
if you are looking to buy bitcoin mining equipment here is some links:

Model Antminer S17 Pro (56Th) from Bitmain mining SHA-256 algorithm with a maximum hashrate of 56Th/s for a power consumption of 2385W.
https://miningwholesale.eu/product/bitmain-antminer-s17-pro-56th-copy/?wpam_id=17
Model Antminer S9K from Bitmain mining SHA-256 algorithm with a maximum hashrate of 14Th/s for a power consumption of 1323W.
https://miningwholesale.eu/product/bitmain-antminer-s9k-14-th-s/?wpam_id=17
Model T2T 30Tfrom Innosilicon mining SHA-256 algorithm with a maximum hashrate of 30Th/s for a power consumption of 2200W.
https://miningwholesale.eu/product/innosilicon-t2t-30t/?wpam_id=17
mining wholesale website:
https://miningwholesale.eu/?wpam_id=17
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Jerry Brito, Executive Director at Coin Center: The Case for Electronic Cash and high level thoughts on Libra

Listed to the full episode Read the full transcript

Meher: Interesting. So I think we’ve never covered this topic with Peter so it will be nice to start with you. Tell us about this paper which is the case for electronic cash. What’s the main thrust and the argument of this of this paper?
Jerry: Sure. So the paper’s actually not completely about cryptocurrency, cryptocurrency kind of comes in at the very end; the paper is actually just a case takeaway electronic. It’s really just a case for cash because I was telling you before when I write a paper, I usually try to imagine a reader that I’m writing for. And in this case my reader was a mid-level official at a law enforcement agency or a regulatory agency, somebody who maybe instinctively thinks cash is something that maybe could be eliminated or that it’s problematic because they’re always dealing with bad guys and you have to say “no actually cash is essential to a liberal open society”, the preservation of which is the reason that many folks in government who are true patriots go into government service and law enforcement service to protect. They want to preserve an open, liberal society. They care about the values this country was founded upon and that’s what they’re dedicating their lives to preserving. I need to explain to them that cash is an essential component of that and that’s what the paper tries to do and the argument is pretty straightforward. I think it’s one that I think it’s pretty intuitive to cryptocurrency enthusiasts, but I think regular folks in government probably don’t think about it. And we are moving to an increasingly cashless society and I described how we’re seeing more and more transactions moving to basically credit cards or mobile payment systems and you can look at certain countries, Nordic countries for example, Korea, where cash at this point is really a relic right? It’s something that is very rare. ATMs are rare, bank branches don’t carry cash and everywhere you go you basically pay with a credit card the way you would pay with cash.
And what I point out is in that world that a cashless society is an intermediated society because if you remove cash as an option that means every single transaction that you do is going to be intermediated by some bank, corporation, or payment provider and what that means is that every transaction is going to be surveilled, it’s going to be seen by a third party and the transaction can be blocked or you know, either selectively or you can be blocked completely from the ability to transact.
When you have that that is a real challenge to a liberal, open society and so then I basically give some examples of how for example in China this is being used. China is really a remarkable case study because in the span of just a few years cash has been almost eliminated, people have just moved completely to using Alipay, WeChat Pay and those two account for I think like 90% of all mobile payments in China. And so what you have there is a world where all transactions are visible by those two companies, which basically means it’s visible to the state and they will block you if you’re trying to do things that in the words of what an executive from Alipay, are not healthy. The other thing that they’ll do is feed into the Chinese social credit scoring system. And this means that you know what you buy and what you do is going to feed into your social credit score which affects things like what schools you can send your kids to, what flights you can take etc. So really this is kind of having an intermediated society really opens up a door for a more authoritarian control of one’s life. That’s state control. You also have corporate potential misuse and the example I gave is Target. There was a case study that I highlight where I this happened five years ago. There was a father of a teenage girl who walked into a Target and basically chewed out the manager said. He had a mailer in his hand that was for baby products right and said “what are you trying to do?” This was sent to my house address to my daughter and she is 16 years old. What are you trying to do, do you think she should be pregnant? The manager looked at it, didn’t know what it was, he apologized and the father went away. A couple days later the manager called the father and said “hey I’m just calling to apologize again”, and the father said “no, actually I owe you an apology, turns out there’s been some activity my house I didn’t know about and my daughter’s due in a couple months.” How did Target know that that girl was pregnant? They know because every time you buy something at Target, Target is tracking you and making a dossier on you. And so what they would do is when you use you don’t even have to opt into this by the way, whenever you shop at Target you are assigned a customer number unbeknownst to you and this is tied to for example, whatever credit card you use that is associated with you and they keep a list of everything that you buy.
So what Target did is that they had a program for expecting mothers where they give them discounts and stuff. And so they knew that this cohort of people who had opted in were pregnant. They then basically just correlated the purchasing activity of those people who they knew were pregnant with their wider universe of customers and just using data mining they could figure out quite specifically who was pregnant and even when they were probably due, based on just the shopping habits. And so this girl was deprived of her privacy and she was deprived of her autonomy, right? She was deprived of her ability to tell her father about her pregnancy on her own terms and she didn’t opt into anything. So what is the only option that you have if you don’t want to participate in that, it’s cash, right? She could have paid in cash. So as we move to an increasingly cashless world we need to preserve a form of cash. And that’s as we all know, cryptocurrency. Right? To me cash isn’t just mean money; cash is a very specific kind of money. It’s money that is person-to-person, its bearer, it is censorship resistant, permissionless, and it is private. And so that’s important.
Listen to the audio on headliner
Sebastien: So moving on to our next topic today, which is Libra. Of course Libra was announced a couple of weeks ago, mid-June and it’s generated a lot of buzz and acclaim and anger and a whole lot of things, a lot of opinions from a whole lot of different angles and perspectives. I’d like to ask you what are your thoughts on Libra at a high level?
Jerry: At a high level it’s just very interesting what they’re doing. I think the bottom line it’s a net positive for cryptocurrency if it launches and it gets adoption where people begin to get used to having a mobile wallet where they have a token that is not denominated in their country’s currency, right? They get used to that and you can imagine that opens up the idea space for other cryptocurrencies. And so that’s all a net plus. On the flip side I’m a little concerned on the regulatory front or on the on the policy front that, cryptocurrency has been sort of a minor policy issue in DC and again, very US-centric, but I can imagine this is the same in capitals all around, you know, cryptocurrency is an issue that policymakers pay attention to but it’s not the top issue and there isn’t any major player that is sort of like the base of crypto you have lots of different folks building lots of different things.
And so you have this vibrant ecosystem and when you have Facebook coming in with a project like this, I think there is a possibility that one cryptocurrency all of a sudden gets a lot of attention for policymakers, and number two Facebook becomes the base of cryptocurrency, even though the project that they’re building is, I would say not a cryptocurrency and completely unlike any of these other things, and so we’ve begun to see folks who reach out to us a little confused about the distinction between something like Libra and Bitcoin or Ethereum. And so part of what we’ve been trying to do is explain these things are completely different, there’s some similarities but they’re very different, and what’s important is that those technical differences drive different policy outcomes.
Listen to the audio on headliner
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No One Actually Knows What Bitcoin Will Do Next

No One Actually Knows What Bitcoin Will Do Next
Bitcoin and cryptocurrency markets are highly volatile and, according to new research, incredibly unpredictable, appearing to move independently of most traditional or expected indicators.
The bitcoin price, which has doubled so far this year after recording heavy losses throughout 2018, is hovering around $8,000 per bitcoin. Most other major cryptocurrencies, including ethereum, bitcoin cash, litecoin, and Ripple's XRP, have also made significant gains in recent months.
Now, it's been revealed that bitcoin and cryptocurrency markets do not respond to any of the things that usually move traditional currencies, stocks and shares, or commodities, data provider Indexica has found.
Bitcoin has swung wildly in price over recent months, exploding higher in April after months of declines.
Getty
"We tested bitcoin and other major cryptocurrencies including ethereum and bitcoin cash in the same way we've tested popular stocks and traditional currencies," said Zak Selbert, chief executive of Indexica.
"From our extensive research, and we've done more testing around bitcoin and cryptocurrencies than we have for pretty much any other asset we've analyzed, it simply appears the bitcoin price and crypto markets just don't respond as we would expect them to."
Stocks, traditional currencies, and commodities generally move on company announcements, government policy, and technological developments, while bitcoin and cryptocurrency prices do not, according to Indexica.
It's been suggested that the bitcoin and cryptocurrency market's relatively young age could be behind the difficulties in pinpointing what's caused market moves.
"As we're dealing with an emerging asset class, crypto evaluation metrics are still largely being developed," said Mati Greenspan, senior market analyst at brokerage eToro. "Stocks, bonds, currencies, and commodities all have decades if not centuries of price discovery, so analysts more or less know what to expect.
"The crypto market has only begun to mature in the last two years, so we don't have any of that. What does work well for crypto analysts are simple technical analysis tools like support and resistance points, especially psychological barriers, as well as sentiment, trend, and above all momentum indicators."
"Bitcoin and crypto prices are all about excitement or lack of," said Glen Goodman, a veteran trader and author of investment advice book, The Crypto Trader. "Nobody really knows for sure whether or not bitcoin will become a major store of value like gold or even a new global reserve currency like the dollar. So any news short of an outright global ban of bitcoin tends to have little lasting impact on bitcoin's price.
"For example, China banned initial coin offerings and bitcoin exchanges in September 2017, which was a huge blow as China was the epicenter of crypto development. Yet within a few weeks, bitcoin's price reached another all-time high!"
Volatility has, meanwhile, returned to the bitcoin market recently, with the bitcoin price recording daily moves that appear to mimic moves last seen at the end of 2018. The daily price change for the month of May averages 4.7%, compared with 3.5% in April and 1.1% in March, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.
Earlier this month, however, Indexica found bitcoin has matured as an asset and there had been a "coming of age" for bitcoin over the past few years, based on the study of the language used in thousands of text documents.
Indexica found bitcoin now is being spoken about in the same way as a company stock, with those in the industry increasingly looking ahead to future developments and less back to the heyday of 2017.
This latest research was designed to examine what has caused the wild swings in the bitcoin price by analyzing data from things like news articles and white papers.
The bitcoin price fell sharply before recovering ground over the last year, though attempts to analyse what exactly moves the price have failed.
CoinDesk
"Sadly, it appears that if you want to know what's moving the bitcoin and cryptocurrency markets, we're not the right people to ask," Selbert said. "Though I don't think anyone could make a better attempt than we have."
"The fact that we couldn't find what drove bitcoin, frankly, means that there isn't a predictive signal to be found," Selbert added. "If there was, we would have found it. What is driving bitcoin isn't easily identifiable with any level of statistical confidence."
The bitcoin price rose from under $1,000 per bitcoin to almost $20,000 throughout 2017 before losing more than 80% of its value last year. A partial recovery so far this year has restored some investors' and traders' faith in bitcoin and cryptocurrencies.
The epic 2017 bitcoin bull run is thought to have been triggered by expectations institutional investment in the bitcoin and cryptocurrency market was imminent but when that failed to materialize in the way many thought it would, the market pulled back sharply.
Some think the latest bitcoin price rally over the last few months is down to interest in the cryptocurrency industry from Silicon Valley tech giants, including social network group Facebook.
Forbes Special Offer: Be among the first to get important crypto and blockchain news and information with Forbes Crypto Confidential.
https://preview.redd.it/ab5twb8vo8431.png?width=200&format=png&auto=webp&s=8ed144a0ae9e96f1da6af50c13725ceb1e02e981
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Wednesday, May 22nd

Today are:

Bitcoin Pizza Day, celebrated mainly by the cryptocurrency community, takes place on the anniversary of the date that cryptocurrency was used to pay for goods for the first time. On May 18, 2010, Laszlo Hanyecz of Florida posted in the bitcointalk.org forum, offering 10,000 bitcoins in exchange for some pizza, saying in part, "I'll pay 10,000 bitcoins for a couple of pizzas.. like maybe 2 large ones so I have some left over for the next day." His call was answered, and on May 22, 2010, he posted, "I just want to report that I successfully traded 10,000 bitcoins for pizza." A teenager named Jeremy Sturdivant, who went by "jercos" on the forum, sent Hanyecz two Papa John's pizzas, and received 10,000 bitcoins in return. Sturdivant paid about $25 for the pizza, and the 10,000 bitcoins he received became valued at $41.
The events of the first Bitcoin Pizza Day were monumental because they paved the way for the use of cryptocurrency in the future. Nine months after the transaction, the worth of the bitcoins totaled $10,000, meaning each bitcoin had the value of a dollar. On the five year anniversary, the value of the 10,000 bitcoins had risen to about $2.4 million. At one point in 2017, the value rose to over $100 million. As of September 2018, a bitcoin is valued at about $6,000, meaning the value of the 10,000 bitcoins used to pay for the pizza would be about $60 million.
The history of bitcoin dates to the early 2000s, when attempts were made to create a cryptocurrency, although none were fully developed. In 2008, a paper titled "Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System" was posted online. The following year, bitcoin became the first cryptocurrency. Its software was made available to the public, and it began being mined. Mining is "the process through which new bitcoins are created and transactions are recorded and verified on the blockchain." With Hanyecz's transaction for goods on the first Bitcoin Pizza Day, bitcoin gained a specific monetary value—up to that point it had only been mined. Rival cryptocurrencies, often known as altcoin, soon emerged. They usually have been created to try to improve an aspect of bitcoin. Early altcoins were Litecoin and Namecoin, and there are now over 1,000.
In 2013, bitcoin's value reached $1,000, but then crashed to about $300. It took a few years to recover. Over time, as it could be spent at more places, bitcoin's popularity continued to grow, as did its value. Time will only tell if the value of bitcoin will continue to rise, but on Bitcoin Pizza Day we can all remember the day the first cryptocurrency transaction for goods took place, and how the value of a transaction for two pizzas once rose to over $100 million.

Canadian Immigrants Day celebrates those who have immigrated to the United States from Canada. Canada is one of the most sparsely populated countries in the world, and most of its inhabitants live within a few hundred miles of its border with the United States. The border is 5,525 miles in length (this includes the border with Alaska) and is the longest border in the world that is not patrolled by military forces. Besides sharing a border, Canada and the United States share many cultural similarities.
Most Canadians immigrate to the United States by getting a green card, which they usually have obtained because they have immediate relatives in the country, or because they are sponsored by an employer there. Canadians migrate to the United States more than they do to any other country. In 1960, about ten percent of the US foreign-born population was Canadian. Although this was down to two percent in 2012, about 800,000 Canadian immigrants lived in the United States at that time.
The first wave of Canadian immigrants arrived in the 1860s; they were largely unskilled and came for factory jobs. A second wave arrived between 1900 and 1930, and were pushed by the discrimination they had faced in employment, education, and because of their religion. Immigration to the United States began to decline after this, as the Canadian economy began to grow after World War II. During the last half of the twentieth century, especially after the passage of the North American Free Trade Agreement in 1994, there was a diversification of Canadian immigrants which included students, those looking to reunite with their families, educated professionals, and retirees with wishes to move to a warmer climate.

Harvey Milk Day honors gay rights activist Harvey Milk and also focuses on stopping discrimination against gays and lesbians. Harvey Milk was born in Long Island, New York, on May 22, 1930. He served in the U.S. Navy during the Korean War, and worked at a Wall Street investment firm for a time afterward, living a closeted gay life at the time. In the early 1960s, his political views were conservative, and he campaigned for Barry Goldwater in 1964. Once he got involved in the New York bohemian theater scene, he began befriending a more avante-garde crowd, and his politics began to shift more progressive. He moved to the San Francisco Bay area in 1969, became involved in the gay social scene, and protested against the Vietnam War. After being fired for participating in an antiwar rally, he returned to New York City in 1970.
After some time working in New York theater, he returned to San Francisco in 1972 and opened a camera shop on Castro Street—the epicenter of the gay community. The following year he ran for a seat on the San Francisco Board of Supervisors for the first time, in part because he thought a tax on small businesses was unfair. He did not win a seat but did manage to finish 10th out of 32 contestants. Afterward, he co-founded the Castro Village Association, which supported gay business owners on Castro Street. He started the Castro Street Fair in 1974, and became known as "Mayor of Castro Street."
He once again lost an election for Board of Supervisors in 1975, and ran for the California State Assembly and was not successful in that bid either. In 1977, he worked to broaden his appeal beyond the gay community, by focusing on taxes, housing, and day-care centers for working mothers. In November 1977, Harvey Milk became the first openly gay person elected to California office, and the first openly gay person elected in a major U.S. city. The rise of Harvey Milk reflected the rise of the gay rights movement across the country, and he was at the forefront of it.
During his tenure in office, Milk pushed for visibility of gay people as well as for social equality. He worked to pass a gay rights ordinance—to ban discrimination in housing, employment, and public accommodations. He spent the summer of 1978 working to defeat Proposition 6—also known as The Briggs Initiative—which would have banned gays and lesbians, or anyone supporting gay rights, from teaching or working in public schools in California. It was defeated at the ballot box that November.
On November 27, 1978, Harvey Milk was assassinated by Dan White, a former Board of Supervisors member, who had resigned a few months earlier and wanted to be reinstated. White first killed San Francisco Mayor George Moscone, and then walked across the building and shot Harvey Milk five times. Dianne Feinstein, who was President of the Board of Supervisors at the time, announced to the press what had taken place. Dan White was convicted of voluntary manslaughter instead of murder, in part because his team used the "Twinkie defense". He was released early and committed suicide in 1985.
Harvey Milk's profile continued to rise after his assassination. In 1982, a biography titled The Mayor of Castro Street was released, bringing Milk's attention to a wider audience. This was followed by an Academy Award-winning documentary, The Times of Harvey Milk, in 1984. Many buildings in California were named after Milk. In 2008, another Academy Award-winning film, Milk, was released. Harvey Milk was posthumously given the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Obama in 2009. That same year, Harvey Milk Day was established by the California legislature and signed into law by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger on October 11. California schools commemorate Milk with activities, events, and projects, and equal rights are focused on. The Harvey Milk Foundation organizes events worldwide.

Sherlock Holmes Day celebrates Sherlock Holmes and the author who created him, Arthur Conan Doyle, who was born on today's date in 1859 in Edinburgh, Scotland. At a young age, Doyle became enthralled by stories his mother told him, which was the spark that eventually would lead him to become a writer. He was sent to a Jesuit preparatory school in England at the age of 9. After a few years, he went on to study at Stonyhurst College, and after graduating in 1876, he went on to pursue a medical degree at the University of Edinburgh. There he met Professor Dr. Joseph Bell, who became his mentor, and later became the inspiration and model for Sherlock Holmes.
While in medical school, Doyle wrote the short stories "The Mystery of Sasassa Valley" and "The American's Tale," the latter of which appeared in London Society magazine. He also worked as a ship surgeon on a whaling ship in the Arctic Circle while in school, which inspired him to write Captain of the Pole Star. After becoming a doctor he moved around for a bit, focusing on his practice, but also continued to write. He also left his Catholic faith and became a Spiritualist. Eventually, he gave up being a doctor and focused solely on his writing and his faith.
Sherlock Holmes and his assistant, Watson, were introduced in the novel A Study in Scarlet, which first appeared in Beeton's Christmas Annual in 1887. It was with this novel that Doyle's writing career finally began taking off. Sherlock Holmes, a "consulting detective" who pursued criminals in London, around England, and throughout Europe, has endured as perhaps the most noteworthy detective character of all time. In all, Doyle wrote 60 stories that featured Sherlock Holmes. Some of Doyle's most noteworthy books that include Sherlock Holmes are The Sign of Four, The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, and The Hound of the Baskervilles.
In 1893, Doyle tried to kill off Holmes in the short story "The Final Problem," because he wanted to focus more on his writing on Spiritualism. His readers weren't happy—20,000 readers even canceled their subscriptions to Strand Magazine, a magazine which Sherlock Holmes stories often appeared in. Eventually, Doyle was convinced to bring Holmes back. He reintroduced him in 1901 in the novel The Hound of Baskervilles, and then brought him back to life in the story "The Adventure of the Empty House" in 1903. One of the reasons he decided to bring him back was so he could use the profits from the stories to help fund his missionary work. The final twelve Sherlock Holmes stories appeared in the 1928 compilation titled The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes.
Besides his works featuring Sherlock Holmes, Doyle wrote other books such as Beyond the City, The Stark Munro Letters, and A Duet with an Occasional Chorus, as well as a series of works on Spiritualism. He was diagnosed with Angina Pectoris towards the end of his life. On July 7, 1930, Arthur Conan Doyle died in his garden with one hand to his chest and one hand holding a flower. The stories of Sherlock Holmes have continued to have been read, and Sherlock has also lived on in theater and film adaptations of his stories. Today we celebrate both Sherlock Holmes and the author who created him!


Happy Celebrating
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Welcome to Polkadot's subreddit - read this guide to get started!

Welcome to dot. Here you will find guides, tools, news, discussions and more.

Subreddit Rules:
What is Polkadot?
Polkadot is a platform that allows diverse blockchains to transfer messages, including value, in a trust-free fashion; sharing their unique features while pooling their security. In brief, Polkadot is a scalable heterogeneous multi-chain technology.
Polkadot is heterogeneous because it is entirely flexible and makes no assumption about the nature or structure of the chains in the network. Even non-blockchain systems or data structures can become parachains if they fulfill a set of criteria.
Polkadot may be considered equivalent to a set of independent chains (e.g. a set containing Ethereum, Ethereum Classic, Namecoin and Bitcoin) except with important additions: pooled security and trust-free interchain transactability.
Join the Community
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So, yeah, cheers on 2 years in the STILL friggin wHild Whest...

I got into crypto, blockchain, and Ethereum specifically about 2 years ago. I still remember the feeling of my mind being blown.
Even coming from heavy tech knowledge and background...the concepts of blockchain seemed a little challenging to fully grasp...and especially the gravity of it all. Cryptocurrency as a form of "money" made ridiculous sense to me...especially when I explained it to my girlfriend.
GF: "So owning cryptocurrency means there's a log that you have a certain amount of something that doesn't really exist except in a shared accounting ledger?"
ME: "Yeah that's basically it...just like cash that represents absolutely nothing but the value people place on it"
As the struggle to make crypto more "adoptable" continued to take form, the problem of trust seemed to exponentially take form. Just this month $660 Million went missing in what Vietnam is investigating as ICO fraud.
The reckless greed of inexperienced "investors" combined with the insatiable greed of fraudulent and clever vapor ware or ICO bandwagon jumpers, has landed cryptocurrency at the epicenter of potentially the sweetest combination game of the financial equivalent of sharks and minnows.
It's why we hear leaders in this industry, such as our Lord Vitalik, cursing the name of ICOs.
People are getting hurt and losing money...and strangely we continue to see the cycle rinse and repeat.
Recently I had the pleasure of writing a Press Release (https://news.bitcoin.com/pr-utrum-to-launch-innovative-blockchain-platform-solving-trust-problems-for-crypto-investors/) for Utrum, the grass roots project which is building a solution to bring trust into cryptocurrency again. When I was putting this PR piece together, something that kept surfacing in my mind was my days as an IT consultant.
When I worked for local clients doing troubleshooting, server work, networking, etc., one theme I remember permeating every workplace was the level of trust and, unfortunately, naivety. Trust in me as the professional coming in to work on their systems...naivety in the blind trust of willingly handing over passwords, opening iphones for me, just about anything I asked for users would happily provide me with.
This is not all trust. Much of it is just being naive to what is possible when you share this information...or write it on a sticky note under your keyboard!
Of course I never used the information nefariously, but the concept of trust vs naive is important. Security can be maintained under the umbrella of trust..but not so much ignorance.
And here we are...2 years in for me...I'm sure many more years for others out here...and if there's one thing I can offer any noobs it's be trusting to a point and only toward those who have proven their trustworthiness....and STOP being greedy.
Good projects can and are being analyzed and looked closely at...yet the information is hard to find and that's something the Utrum project with whom I'm now working is looking to improve and change with crowd wisdom and Ai...
But if you act cautiously, surround yourself with level headed folks here in the community, and focus on projects that put development first...you'll find investing in crypto a lot more profitable and fun.
But it's not ALL doom and gloom!
When I began my journey into crypto and especially ETH, I found an incredible community of like-minded people who are all working toward a different kind of world and global economy. I started out with the idea of just helping others and thus was born my guide to ethereum that I shared here.
And from a financial perspective I've learned soooo much about blockchain technology, I've learned to program smart contracts in solidity, I've released several Ether based tokens, and learned to day trade cryptocurrency at the level of full time income.
I also learned the value of building something great, of creating and supporting and partnering with valuable and helpful projects that are truly doing good in the world...whether that's the online or physical world.
It's helped reshape my own economics view, world view, and perspectives on politics, policies, and how we spend our resources, time and energy.
When I first encountered Ether and Crypto I felt like I had found a missing piece. Today is no different. I'm happy to be a part of this global community, coin-agnostic, and happy to be now working for a crypto project and helping build good into the ecosystem that is the blockchain, "new internet" and new economy movement.
Cheers on 2 years!
John
submitted by ethadvisor to ethtrader [link] [comments]

Of Wolves and Weasels - Day 788 - Money Changes Everything

Hey all, GoodShibe here!
In my opinion, one of the truly wonderful things about our community is that we have such a vast array of Shibes here with us, each with their own hopes and dreams and ideas - each with their own concept of what 'To the Moon' means and what the overall Dogecoin Experience entails.
Some folks believe that the future of Dogecoin is to become an investment vehicle a la Bitcoin. That people should just buy up huge swaths of Dogecoin and sit on it, hoping that, eventually, it'll grow or spike and they'll see a return.
Some believe that Dogecoin is better off as a common currency, that, because there are so many coins the value will eventually even out and stabilize enough that, whatever their worth, both merchants and consumers will be able to safely transact in it.
Some just laugh at the whole idea of value at all and just want to throw invisible pennies at each other across the void while cracking up at the whole idea of it.
The truth is that all of these experiences are valid and important. In fact, I believe that what lies behind these ideals are very real needs that come from a good place - and each of them have a part to play in our success.
Those who want Dogecoin to be an investment vehicle, sure there's the making more money aspect, but some also believe that there is a great opportunity here to reclaim the glories of the past. There is no dispute that having more money involved with our coin would get more people involved - the times when the community was truly active and exploding with creativity and silliness was when our speculative value was high. I believe that when people are asking for more 'Investment' what they're really asking for is to find a way to drive engagement back to the levels that it was.
I suspect that those who want Dogecoin to be a common currency are also hoping to see Dogecoin become more widely available. Yes, Dogecoin began as a joke, laughing at the silliness of all of this, but, over time, it became popular because people saw an actual use for it. I believe that these people are expressing a need to see Dogecoin recognized not just for what it began as, but also recognized for what it has become. Our network is faster and cheaper than almost anyone's and there is a real, honest case to be made for people to engage with our coin -- be that as a "starter" coin for newbies or as a "common coin" of the internet realm... or both... or more. It began as a joke, sure, but it clearly isn't just a joke any more.
Finally, those who want Dogecoin to remain relatively low value - that it stays a coin used for silly acts of awesomeness - I believe they're expressing a need for Dogecoin not to lose it's soul. One of the great fears that comes with success is the simple fact that, as the lady said, Money changes everything.
It's a crazy balancing act because all of these needs are a priority in some way - each and all of these needs are actually integral not just to the success of Dogecoin, but to the core of what makes it great.
The harsh reality is that we tend to romanticize the past, it's okay, it's human nature, but the truth is that back in the days when we had a high speculative value, we also had a ridiculous amount of scammers and such skulking around. I remember, when /DogecoinScamWatch was really active, having a conversation with one weasel who literally told me the only reason that they scammed people was because "it was so easy". Yes, we had a ton of activity and people swarming this place but a lot of people lost a lot of money, and were turned off of crypto entirely, because of the acts of a few miscreants. So, too much investment, too fast, tends to bring exactly the kind of people you don't want involved with our coin.
And while our network may be faster and we may be a great introductory coin, it doesn't matter if there is no reason to use it. We've lobbed around ideas like microtransactions and micropayments for a long while, but the fact is that, after 2 years -- outside of tipping, which has dropped off a cliff -- there has been no growth. No growth, because there is no core demand, no central "must have" reason to choose Dogecoin over any other crypto with similar or more value. Most of the merchants who accept Dogecoin do it in combination with many other coins, an "I'll keep my options open" approach that does not drive growth. What is the point of these coins? We can have a stable value, sure, but if they're stable and worthless, what incentive does a merchant have to bother taking them at all except for that "keep my options open" scenario?
Lastly, it's great to have a coin that we can just laugh and toss around at one another - that is freely shared and no one really cares about... but if that comes to pass then we have the utter death of the coin. Those who are merge mining us are not doing so out of the goodness of their hearts, they're trying desperately to reclaim energy costs, let alone make a profit. Yes, if they were all to go away tomorrow, we'd all get together and fire up our ASICs and video cards again... and then promptly have our coin torn apart by miscreants who only want to see Dogecoin burn -- which was the entire case for Merged-mining anyway.
In the end it is a delicate balance between slow, stable growth driving interest and usage while maintaining an active community that is welcoming to newcomers but is also instilling a strong sense of "values". We're not just bringing new people to Dogecoin, we're helping them to see what we see: That money can and should be fun too; that we are stronger when we work together and that silliness absolutely can be a business plan.
I believe that the reason we're still here is exactly because we've managed to hit on a balance of this already. The field is utterly littered with coins that have had "better tech" or "better ideas" but never caught on, that could never find that balance. That we've managed to start out laughing and still be here two years later is an achievement to be incredibly proud of. And each and every one of you has played an integral role in making that happen.
If it seems frustrating that, after two years, we don't seem to have gained the traction that we should have, please also recognize that we've been subject to a pretty powerful external factor as well:
Out in the world we're experiencing one of the greatest times ever -- across the world -- of economic uncertainty. Many people don't have money to feed their families, let alone get involved with a virtual one. I believe that this is case #1 for why Cryptocurrency as a whole has stalled and it's major epicenters, right now, are places like China (which has seen ridiculous economic growth over the last few years). The people who have money to burn have the ability to take risks and get involved with new ideas. This really does, at some point, break down to simple psychology.
I believe that until the external world gets its collective act together, cryptocurrency, as a whole, is going to remain stagnant.
The trick is for us to keep on keeping on until the clouds part. To make sure we all keep on laughing through the long winter and keep building so that once the world pulls out of this slump (and we will), there are things for new-Shibes to see and do and laugh at.
Because once things get hopping around here again, we're all going to be mighty busy ;D)
It's 7:25AM EST and our Global Hashrate is holding at 1710 Gigahashes per second and our Difficulty is holding at ~38817.
As always, I appreciate your support!
GoodShibe
submitted by GoodShibe to dogecoin [link] [comments]

CBS News CryptoCurrency Specials - On with a cameo from Steemian @KennethBosak

One with a cameo from Steemian @KennethBosak (self.steemit) not "On" (mod you can fix and edit title and this text out if you are able to)
Shared this on Steemit yesterday morning but before the videos get lost, here is the whole content of the post right here for reddit, no upvote fishing here, enjoy the content now! Basically three videos were released on CBS News youtube channel yesterday and I was pleasantly surprised to find a Steemit user and huge crypto nerd @KennethBosak out in the longest video talking tech. Here is that video (skip to 2 min in to see him), the other two are below it.
A booming cryptocurrency mining industry is disrupting a small town in Washington State.
As the soaring value of Bitcoin sets off a flurry of excitement, a whole new industry—cryptocurrency mining—is erupting in unexpected parts of the globe, causing rifts in the communities that host it. CBS correspondent Errol Barnett heads to the epicenter of cryptocurrency mining, to explore how this phenomenon is unfolding, and the controversy over its future.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S00MWI3YeP4
Should the United States get rid of cash and create a national cryptocurrency?
"According to the Federal Reserve, Americans still use cash more frequently than any other payment method, but could the rise of cryptocurrencies change that? Duke University finance professor Campbell Brown argues that the United States should ditch paper currency for fully trackable national version of Bitcoin. "
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=41sWJOJ35d4
Blockchain, explained by a venture capitalist investing $2 million in the technology
Bitcoin -- and cryptocurrencies in general -- have received a lot of attention over the past year. Garry Tan, managing partner of Initialized Capital, explains how blockchain, the underlying technology behind Bitcoin, has the potential to reshape the world.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_eC25Un1c9o
submitted by CryptoCollectibles to steemit [link] [comments]

What are the best sites that analyze individual cryptocurrencies/projects?

I've been recently going through looking for quality news sites, blogs, youtubers, podcasts, and other resources for learning about cryptocurrencies, but I'm having trouble finding websites that do in-depth analysis of various cryptos for their long-term value (AKA not trading/technical-analysis) and potential. Youtube is full of options, but I prefer text as it is easier to skim, read, and come back to. BlockGeeks has some good content, but it's pretty limited. CrushCrypto is very thorough but I don't agree with their opinions. Does anyone have any suggestions?
I'll include other resources I've found here below...
Good podcasts
-Lets talk bitcoin -Crypto Voices -Epicenter -CryptoVerse -The Ether Review -BlockChannel 
Portfolio Watching/Management
 -Blockfolio -Altpocket -EveningStar 
Good news
-EveningStar news aggregator -Bitcoin Magazine -Crypto Primer -CoinTelegraph (can be sensational) 
Good youtube
-crypt0 -DataDash -Ameer Rosic -CryptoPortfolio -Aantonop -Crypto Coins (Still working on this one, here's a post with more options: https://www.reddit.com/CryptoCurrency/comments/7ax5dc/guys_ive_made_a_list_of_crypto_youtubers/) 
Good Blogs: (mostly a curated list from Jameson Lopp's BTC resources page, more BTC heavy)
-https://thecontrol.co/ -https://medium.com/@cburniske -https://medium.com/@jimmysong -https://jpkoning.blogspot.mx/ -https://medium.com/@nopara73 -http://blog.oleganza.com/ -http://www.ofnumbers.com/ -http://www.truthcoin.info/archive/ -https://medium.com/@tuurdemeester -http://unenumerated.blogspot.mx/ (Not much new content, but Nick Szabo) -https://vinnylingham.com/ 
Thanks for your help.
submitted by pythoniac1 to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: btc top posts from 2017-01-09 to 2017-02-07 22:40 PDT

Period: 29.80 days
Submissions Comments
Total 999 28052
Rate (per day) 33.52 904.13
Unique Redditors 409 2067
Combined Score 56126 117584

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 3835 points, 41 submissions: Egon_1
    1. "One miner loses $12k from BU bug, some Core devs scream. Users pay millions in excessive tx fees over the last year "meh, not a priority" (529 points, 262 comments)
    2. Charlie Shrem: "Oh cmon. @gavinandresen is the reason we are all here today. Stop attacking people, ...." (256 points, 61 comments)
    3. The core developers don't care about you. Let's fire them by hard fork to Bitcoin unlimited! (231 points, 83 comments)
    4. Bitcoin Core Hashrate Below 80% (211 points, 27 comments)
    5. "Bitcoin is an P2P electronic cash system, not digital gold. If Bitcoin's usefulness as cash is undermined, its value will be undermined too." (198 points, 196 comments)
    6. I like these ads (194 points, 25 comments)
    7. "ViaBTC Transaction Accelerator already help more than 5K delayed transactions got confirmed." (142 points, 27 comments)
    8. Bitcoin Unlimited: Over 800 PH/s (128 points, 21 comments)
    9. ViaBTC produces ZERO empty block in the last month. Best in SPV base mining pool. (117 points, 2 comments)
    10. New ATL (All Time Low) For Bitcoin Core Blocks (114 points, 59 comments)
  2. 2876 points, 24 submissions: ydtm
    1. The debate is not "SHOULD THE BLOCKSIZE BE 1MB VERSUS 1.7MB?". The debate is: "WHO SHOULD DECIDE THE BLOCKSIZE?" (1) Should an obsolete temporary anti-spam hack freeze blocks at 1MB? (2) Should a centralized dev team soft-fork the blocksize to 1.7MB? (3) OR SHOULD THE MARKET DECIDE THE BLOCKSIZE? (354 points, 116 comments)
    2. BU-SW parity! 231 vs 231 of the last 1000 blocks! Consensus will always win over censorship! MARKET-BASED blocksize will always win over CENTRALLY-PLANNED blocksize! People want blocksize to be determined by the MARKET - not by Greg Maxwell & his 1.7MB anyone-can-spend SegWit-as-a-soft-fork blocks. (271 points, 66 comments)
    3. The number of blocks being mined by Bitcoin Unlimited is now getting very close to surpassing the number of blocks being mined by SegWit! More and more people are supporting BU's MARKET-BASED BLOCKSIZE - because BU avoids needless transaction delays and ultimately increases Bitcoin adoption & price! (185 points, 80 comments)
    4. "Notice how anyone who has even remotely supported on-chain scaling has been censored, hounded, DDoS'd, attacked, slandered & removed from any area of Core influence. Community, business, Hearn, Gavin, Jeff, XT, Classic, Coinbase, Unlimited, ViaBTC, Ver, Jihan, Bitcoin.com, btc" ~ u/randy-lawnmole (176 points, 114 comments)
    5. "Why is Flexible Transactions more future-proof than SegWit?" by u/ThomasZander (175 points, 110 comments)
    6. "You have to understand that Core and their supporters eg Theymos WANT a hardfork to be as messy as possible. This entire time they've been doing their utmost to work AGAINST consensus, and it will continue until they are simply removed from the community like the cancer they are." ~ u/singularity87 (170 points, 28 comments)
    7. Blockstream/Core don't care about you. They're repeatedly crippling the network with their DEV-CONTROLLED blocksize. Congestion & delays are now ROUTINE & PREDICTABLE after increased difficulty / time between blocks. Only we can fix the network - using MARKET-CONTROLLED blocksize (Unlimited/Classic) (168 points, 60 comments)
    8. 3 excellent articles highlighting some of the major problems with SegWit: (1) "Core Segwit – Thinking of upgrading? You need to read this!" by WallStreetTechnologist (2) "SegWit is not great" by Deadalnix (3) "How Software Gets Bloated: From Telephony to Bitcoin" by Emin Gün Sirer (146 points, 59 comments)
    9. This trader's price & volume graph / model predicted that we should be over $10,000 USD/BTC by now. The model broke in late 2014 - when AXA-funded Blockstream was founded, and started spreading propaganda and crippleware, centrally imposing artificially tiny blocksize to suppress the volume & price. (143 points, 97 comments)
    10. Now that BU is overtaking SW, r\bitcoin is in meltdown. The 2nd top post over there (sorted by "worst first" ie "controversial") is full of the most ignorant, confused, brainwashed comments ever seen on r\bitcoin - starting with the erroneous title: "The problem with forking and creating two coins." (142 points, 57 comments)
  3. 2424 points, 31 submissions: realistbtc
    1. Remember this picture ? It was a very strong and cool message from around 2014 . Well, sadly it's not true anymore. But it was universally liked in the Bitcoin space , and probably brought here some of us . I remember even luke-jr reposting it somewhere (oh , the hypocrysis!! ). (249 points, 55 comments)
    2. Emin Gun Sirer on Twitter ' My take is the exact opposite: we are now finding out that Segwit isn't necessary and we can get the same benefits via simpler means. " (248 points, 46 comments)
    3. Gavin Andresen on Twitter : ' The purpose of a consensus system is to arrive at one outcome. Participating means accepting the result even if you initially disagree. ' (204 points, 56 comments)
    4. enough with the blockstream core propaganda : changing the blocksize IS the MORE CAUTIOUS and SAFER approach . if it was done sooner , we would have avoived entirely these unprecedented clycles of network clogging that have caused much frustrations in a lot of actors (173 points, 15 comments)
    5. Gavin Andresen on Twitter - 'This can't be controversial... can it? - a definition of Bitcoin' (136 points, 38 comments)
    6. adam back on twitter "contentious forks are bad idea for confidence & concept of digital scarcity. wait for the ETFs. profit. mean time deploy segwit & lightning" - no! a corrupt company like blockstream with a washed out ex cypherpunk like adam are what's bad for Bitcoin . (122 points, 115 comments)
    7. "Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System" - if you stray from that , you don't get to keep calling it Bitcoin. call it blockstreamcoin, adamcoin, gregcoin, theymoscoin or whatever and go fork off yourself . (112 points, 19 comments)
    8. soon 21 will have to change the scale , because 180 satoshi/KB won't be enough anymore - madness - feel free to send your complaints to greg maxwell CTO of blockstream (112 points, 31 comments)
    9. PSA : if you use a ledger wallet , you risk paying an absurdly high free - see here : 10$ for a 225 bytes 150$ tx - but remember , it's all fine for your elitist and gregonomic friends at blockstream (109 points, 111 comments)
    10. Luke 'the liar' Dashjr : ' My BIP draft didn't make progress because the community opposes any block size increase hardfork ever. ' -- yes , he wrote exactly that !! (96 points, 33 comments)
  4. 2129 points, 43 submissions: increaseblocks
    1. After failing to get 10K bitcoins for stolen NSA exploits, Shadow Brokers post farewell message, dump a cache of Windows hacking tools online (181 points, 23 comments)
    2. Coinbase and the IRS (146 points, 69 comments)
    3. Ryan X. Charles on Twitter - There is a leadership gap in bitcoin left by technical community members who didn't listen to miners, businesses or users. (117 points, 44 comments)
    4. Blockstream Core developer says you should "pay a $5 fee" to get your transaction to go through! (116 points, 32 comments)
    5. $2.50 transaction FEE paid on $37 transaction, still unconfirmed for 24 hours!! (109 points, 37 comments)
    6. Blockstream shareholder gives a little more insight into the company (107 points, 33 comments)
    7. Finished setting up my Unlimited full node. Took just over 24 hrs to sync with a 5 yr old laptop and standard U.S. connection + $50 1TB hard drive! (96 points, 46 comments)
    8. Matt Corallo/TheBlueMatt leaves Blockstream to go work for Chaincode Labs... is the Blockstream house of cards beginning to crumble? (86 points, 175 comments)
    9. 53,000 transactions in the backlog! (75 points, 79 comments)
    10. Doctor ₿ Goss on Twitter: Spending a year on #segwit instead of coordinating blocksize increase may not have been wise. Money that doesn't work is worthless (70 points, 11 comments)
  5. 1590 points, 9 submissions: parban333
    1. Dear Theymos, you divided the Bitcoin community. Not Roger, not Gavin, not Mike. It was you. And dear Blockstream and Core team, you helped, not calling out the abhorrent censorship, the unforgivable manipulation, unbecoming of supposed cypherpunks. Or of any decent, civil persons. (566 points, 87 comments)
    2. nullc disputes that Satoshi Nakamoto left Gavin in control of Bitcoin, asks for citation, then disappears after such citation is clearly provided. greg maxwell is blatantly a toxic troll and an enemy of Satoshi's Bitcoin. (400 points, 207 comments)
    3. Remember: while the blockstream trolls take Peter R out of context, Peter Todd really think Bitcoin should have a 1%/security tax via inflation. (146 points, 92 comments)
    4. So, Alice is causing a problem. Alice is then trying to sell you a solution for that problem. Alice now tell that if you are not buying into her solution, you are the cause of the problem. Replace Alice with Greg & Adam.. (139 points, 28 comments)
    5. SegWit+limited on-chain scaling: brought to you by the people that couldn't believe Bitcoin was actually a sound concept. (92 points, 47 comments)
    6. Remember: the manipulative Adam Back, CEO of Blockstream, want to fool every newcomer that doesn't know better into thinking that he practically invented Bitcoin. (91 points, 22 comments)
    7. Not only segwit support is laughable at the moment for something targeting 95% adoption, but it's actually diminishing. Wallet devs and people that spent resources implementing that ridiculous contraption must feel a bit silly at the moment.... (83 points, 143 comments)
    8. It's ironic that blockstream's concerns about hard forks security are what's actually caused concerns about hard forks security. (46 points, 5 comments)
    9. The Intercept - "Hidden loopholes allow FBI agents to infiltrate political and religious groups" - Just something to consider, right? (27 points, 2 comments)
  6. 1471 points, 10 submissions: sandakersmann
    1. Charlie Shrem on Twitter: "If we don't implement bigger blocks ASAP, Paypal will be cheaper than #bitcoin. I already pay a few dollars per tx. Stop hindering growth." (472 points, 254 comments)
    2. Olivier Janssens on Twitter: "Do you like Bitcoin? Then you like an unlimited block size. The limit was put in place as a temp fix and was never hit before last year." (252 points, 189 comments)
    3. Ryan X. Charles on Twitter: "Bigger blocks will allow more people access to every aspect of bitcoin, enhancing decentralization" (213 points, 179 comments)
    4. Is Bitcoin Unlimited Headed for Activation? (149 points, 38 comments)
    5. Marius Kjærstad on Twitter: "High fees push real economy out of #Bitcoin and makes price driven by speculation. Result is a lower real economy floor to catch the knife." (132 points, 37 comments)
    6. No Primary Litecoin Pool Will Upgrade to Segwit, Says LTC1BTC's Founder (103 points, 60 comments)
    7. Charlie Shrem: "Bitcoin is been built to appreciate or die. That's how it is. It has to continue to grow. If it doesn't grow then it's just gonna go away." (76 points, 15 comments)
    8. G. Andrew Stone & Andrew Clifford: Bitcoin Unlimited (Episode 166) (36 points, 1 comment)
    9. Joseph VaughnPerling on Twitter: "#SegWit on $LTC's safe b/c low TX vol. AnyoneCanSpend TX UTXO unlikely to hit 51% attack cost. On $BTC it'd be insidiously fatal. @SegWit" (21 points, 8 comments)
    10. Bitcoin Plummets After China Launches "Market Manipulation" Investigations Of Bitcoin Exchanges (17 points, 0 comments)
  7. 1408 points, 7 submissions: BeijingBitcoins
    1. LOL - /bitcoin user claims that people aren't being actively silenced; is actively silenced. (307 points, 142 comments)
    2. Reality check: today's minor bug caused the bitcoin.com pool to miss out on a $12000 block reward, and was fixed within hours. Core's 1MB blocksize limit has cost the users of bitcoin >$100k per day for the past several months. (270 points, 173 comments)
    3. Satoshi: "The eventual solution will be to not care how big [block size] gets." (250 points, 75 comments)
    4. Top post on /bitcoin about high transaction fees. 709 comments. Every time you click "load more comments," there is nothing there. How many posts are being censored? The manipulation of free discussion by /bitcoin moderators needs to end yesterday. (229 points, 91 comments)
    5. Bitcoin Unlimited blocks at all time high! (143 of last 1000) (191 points, 56 comments)
    6. Censored in bitcoin: "Bitcoin Core hashrate reaches 79.7%" (91 points, 61 comments)
    7. Bitcoin Transaction Fees - All Time (70 points, 18 comments)
  8. 1235 points, 40 submissions: chinawat
    1. Julian Assange just used the bitcoin block number 447506 as a proof of life. (199 points, 42 comments)
    2. "$3000 donated anonymously to the @internetarchive in bitcoin just now. Made our day!" -- Brewster Kahle on Twitter (97 points, 3 comments)
    3. ‘Barclays took my £440,000 and put me through hell’ | Money (76 points, 22 comments)
    4. Venezuelan Police Arrest Eight Bitcoin Miners in Two Weeks, and the Country's Leading Bitcoin Exchange Suspends Operations (52 points, 2 comments)
    5. The Path To $10,000 Bitcoin (46 points, 11 comments)
    6. How Deutsche Bank Made a $462 Million Loss Disappear (44 points, 6 comments)
    7. "The plan (#mBTC units) has been discussed amongst local #Chinese exchanges, & we believe it will appease the regulators, w/ "lower" prices." -- Bobby Lee on Twitter (43 points, 36 comments)
    8. "Everyone knows that we need to reduce the max block size, but is a one-time drop to 300 kB really the best way?" -- theymos (40 points, 68 comments)
    9. Buy bitcoin from any 7-11 in the Philippines (36 points, 0 comments)
    10. The Race Is On for a Bitcoin ETF (31 points, 14 comments)
  9. 1010 points, 17 submissions: 1and1make5
    1. Last 1000 Blocks - Bitcoin Unlimited overtakes soft-fork-segwit signaling (165 points, 25 comments)
    2. Again: Bigger Blocks Mean More Decentralization - Roger Ver (101 points, 59 comments)
    3. cnLedger on Twitter - "@todu77 Contacted http://BTC.TOP . A different logic was used when dealing w/ (very occasional) empty blc. They'll update to BU only" (94 points, 6 comments)
    4. Controlling your own wealth as a basic human right - Brian Armstrong (93 points, 30 comments)
    5. Last 1000 Blocks - 20% of the Bitcoin mining network supports Bitcoin Unlimited (89 points, 4 comments)
    6. BTC.top current hashrate: ~100 Ph/s (71 points, 5 comments)
    7. Throwback Thursday: BTC.top mined their first BU block 1 month ago with ~31 Ph/s, today they have ~149 Ph/s (68 points, 6 comments)
    8. Epicenter Bitcoin 166 - G. Andrew Stone & Andrew Clifford: Bitcoin Unlimited (63 points, 50 comments)
    9. Coinbase Obtains the Bitlicense (53 points, 19 comments)
    10. Fun fact (doesn't mean anything): In the last 24 hours more blocks have signaled support for Bitcoin Unlimited than soft-fork-segwit (53 points, 5 comments)
  10. 984 points, 20 submissions: seweso
    1. Bitcoin unlimited is an expression of freedom. And freedom will always be misconstrued by paternalists/statists as something dangerous. (120 points, 64 comments)
    2. My hope for Bitcoin Unlimited is not to force a hardfork upon everyone, but to break through the censorship, to open minds. (106 points, 88 comments)
    3. Core threatening a POW change makes absolutely no sense whatsoever. (97 points, 58 comments)
    4. "We will run a SegWit release in production by the time [a 2MB hardfork] is released in a version of Bitcoin Core." (94 points, 84 comments)
    5. Blocked by Peter Todd for pointing out he started the propaganda war with his slippery slope video. (92 points, 41 comments)
    6. I can't wait to spend everyone's SegWit funds on a hard-forked >1Mb chain. ~ Seweso (72 points, 72 comments)
    7. BashCo putting his Bitcoin ignorance on display by stating "60,000 #Bitcoin transactions don't just magically appear out of thin air. #spam" (66 points, 12 comments)
    8. Bitcoin Core developers discussing and deciding on Bitcoin economics again (47 points, 13 comments)
    9. Reaction to: why-bitcoin-unlimiteds-emergent-consensus-gamble (46 points, 9 comments)
    10. "@seweso Show me an instance where core pushed out a change and cost miners a block reward." ~ I can do that ;) (37 points, 6 comments)
  11. 883 points, 16 submissions: Shock_The_Stream
    1. Emin Gün Sirer: Finally getting to the crux of the battle. LN/Segwit/fee-market are a synonym for "high fees." Nothing about this tech requires high fees. (155 points, 78 comments)
    2. BTC.TOP !! - New Alltime High for BU blocks @199 ! BTC.TOP alone just mined 4 BU blocks within 47 minutes (115 points, 26 comments)
    3. The great halvening of Samson's Segwit Pool: Mission accomplished! 1 yr: 12.50%, 6 month: 11.10%, 1 month: 7.83%, 1week: 6.67%, 4 days: 6% (107 points, 56 comments)
    4. Surpise: SegWit SF becomes more and more centralized - around half of all Segwit signals come from Bitfury ... (107 points, 45 comments)
    5. BS of the week by Rusty Russell: "If segwit doesn't activate, something is badly broken in Bitcoin" (102 points, 97 comments)
    6. Slush pool: Incredible bad luck for the Bitcoin Unlimited voters (43 points, 26 comments)
    7. The Bitfury Attack (43 points, 38 comments)
    8. 799! Jiang Zhuo'er teared down this wall! (40 points, 13 comments)
    9. Did Slush just stop mining segwit with the 'don't care' voters? (39 points, 36 comments)
    10. Fortune favours the bold: BTC.TOP with 300% luck today (30 points, 2 comments)
  12. 754 points, 10 submissions: AQuentson
    1. Price Shoots Up as Miners Checkmate and Bitcoin Unlimited Surpasses Segwit. (113 points, 28 comments)
    2. One Transaction Will Cost $400 if Bitcoin Hits $10,000 According to Jameson Lopp (104 points, 39 comments)
    3. Bitcoin Core Developer: Satoshi's Design Doesn't Work (100 points, 78 comments)
    4. Wow! Had no idea the BitcoinMarkets subreddit is completely censored. (90 points, 29 comments)
    5. F2Pool Will Not Upgrade Its Bitcoin Pool to Segwit "Anytime Soon" (89 points, 21 comments)
    6. The Bitcoin Market Needs Big Blocks, Says Founder of BTC.TOP Mining Pool (82 points, 21 comments)
    7. Almost $1 Billion Worth of Bitcoins Stuck in Transaction Backlog (72 points, 8 comments)
    8. ViaBTC's Hashrate Increases to 12 Percent (58 points, 2 comments)
    9. “The protocol debate is not my priority." - Jihan Wu, Bitmain's Founder (24 points, 13 comments)
    10. Wow! Almost $1 Billion Worth of Bitcoin is Stuck, Can't Move - What Happens if no Block is Found in One Hour (as has happened before) Will Bitcoin Literally Break Down? (22 points, 14 comments)
  13. 744 points, 10 submissions: BobsBurgers3Bitcoin
    1. Bitcoin Unlimited 1.0.0 has been released (274 points, 130 comments)
    2. Censored in r\Bitcoin: "35.8 Cents: Average Transaction Fee so far in 2017. The Average Transaction Fee in 2016 was 16.5 Cents" (260 points, 123 comments)
    3. 35.8 Cents: Average Transaction Fee so far in 2017. The Average Transaction Fee in 2016 was 16.5 Cents (74 points, 18 comments)
    4. Former Fed Employee Fined $5,000 for Using Computer for Bitcoin (37 points, 5 comments)
    5. Bitcoin: Why It Now Belongs in Every Portfolio (26 points, 0 comments)
    6. Bitcoin is 'a great hedge against the system' and could be the new gold (18 points, 1 comment)
    7. Bitcoin Will Change Money Like the Internet Changed Video (15 points, 0 comments)
    8. Is Warren Buffett Wrong About Bitcoin? (14 points, 3 comments)
    9. Bitseed Review – A Plug & Play Full Bitcoin Node (13 points, 2 comments)
    10. Bitcoin is soaring (and Business Insider does not change the title of the almost identical article published 3 weeks ago by the same author) (13 points, 1 comment)
  14. 732 points, 10 submissions: specialenmity
    1. Fantasy land: Thinking that a hard fork will be disastrous to the price, yet thinking that a future average fee of > $1 and average wait times of > 1 day won't be disastrous to the price. (209 points, 70 comments)
    2. "Segwit is a permanent solution to refuse any blocksize increase in the future and move the txs and fees to the LN hubs. The chinese miners are not as stupid as the blockstream core devaluators want them to be." shock_the_stream (150 points, 83 comments)
    3. In response to the "unbiased" ELI5 of Core vs BU and this gem: "Core values trustlessness and decentralization above all. Bitcoin Unlimited values low fees for on-chain transactions above all else." (130 points, 45 comments)
    4. Core's own reasoning doesn't add up: If segwit requires 95% of last 2016 blocks to activate, and their fear of using a hardfork instead of a softfork is "splitting the network", then how does a hardfork with a 95% trigger even come close to potentially splitting the network? (96 points, 130 comments)
    5. luke-jr defines "using bitcoin" as running a full node. Dictates that the cost of moving money ( a transaction) should exceed "using bitcoin". Hah (38 points, 17 comments)
    6. If it's not activating that is a strong evidence that the claims of it being dire were and continue to be without substance. nullc (36 points, 23 comments)
    7. I'm more concerned that bitcoin can't change than whether or not we scale in the near future by SF or HF (26 points, 9 comments)
    8. "The best available research right now suggested an upper bound of 4MB. This figure was considering only a subset of concerns, in particular it ignored economic impacts, long term sustainability, and impacts on synchronization time.." nullc (20 points, 4 comments)
    9. At any point in time mining pools could have increased the block reward through forking and yet they haven't. Why? Because it is obvious that the community wouldn't like that and correspondingly the price would plummet (14 points, 14 comments)
    10. The flawed mind of jstolfi (13 points, 17 comments)
  15. 708 points, 7 submissions: knight222
    1. BTC.TOP operator: “We have prepared $100 million USD to kill the small fork of CoreCoin, no matter what POW algorithm, sha256 or scrypt or X11 or any other GPU algorithm. Show me your money. We very much welcome a CoreCoin change to POS.” (241 points, 252 comments)
    2. For those who missed it, this is how the hardfork with Bitcoin Unlimited will happen. (173 points, 79 comments)
    3. Blocks mined with Bitcoin Unlimited reaching 18% (133 points, 28 comments)
    4. Bitcoin Unlimited is less than 1% away from outpacing Segwit for the last 1000 blocks mined (90 points, 44 comments)
    5. BU nodes peaked in the last days (28 points, 6 comments)
    6. Blockstream never tried to compromise but they will (too late). This is why: (22 points, 4 comments)
    7. BTC.TOP is having a good day (21 points, 6 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. Adrian-X (3622 points, 821 comments)
  2. H0dl (3157 points, 563 comments)
  3. Bitcoinopoly (2732 points, 345 comments)
  4. knight222 (2319 points, 361 comments)
  5. MeTheImaginaryWizard (2043 points, 429 comments)
  6. Ant-n (1818 points, 387 comments)
  7. todu (1756 points, 265 comments)
  8. seweso (1742 points, 328 comments)
  9. awemany (1690 points, 401 comments)
  10. Shock_The_Stream (1647 points, 217 comments)
  11. Helvetian616 (1578 points, 206 comments)
  12. Egon_1 (1478 points, 162 comments)
  13. realistbtc (1299 points, 95 comments)
  14. BitcoinIsTehFuture (1231 points, 139 comments)
  15. LovelyDay (1226 points, 196 comments)
  16. thcymos (1172 points, 117 comments)
  17. BeijingBitcoins (1098 points, 58 comments)
  18. Yheymos (1061 points, 69 comments)
  19. steb2k (1058 points, 238 comments)
  20. ydtm (987 points, 132 comments)
  21. dontcensormebro2 (975 points, 106 comments)
  22. chinawat (972 points, 223 comments)
  23. increaseblocks (934 points, 73 comments)
  24. segregatedwitness (921 points, 101 comments)
  25. Annapurna317 (874 points, 146 comments)
  26. DaSpawn (817 points, 162 comments)
  27. insette (808 points, 91 comments)
  28. TanksAblazment (803 points, 150 comments)
  29. blockstreamcoin (787 points, 133 comments)
  30. MeatsackMescalero (774 points, 95 comments)
  31. satoshis_sockpuppet (745 points, 126 comments)
  32. BitcoinXio (739 points, 50 comments)
  33. jstolfi (734 points, 183 comments)
  34. singularity87 (720 points, 90 comments)
  35. Richy_T (704 points, 163 comments)
  36. redlightsaber (690 points, 138 comments)
  37. Leithm (686 points, 74 comments)
  38. ErdoganTalk (668 points, 252 comments)
  39. BitcoinPrepper (665 points, 89 comments)
  40. reddaxx (664 points, 105 comments)
  41. r1q2 (660 points, 110 comments)
  42. papabitcoin (653 points, 79 comments)
  43. 2ndEntropy (632 points, 76 comments)
  44. FormerlyEarlyAdopter (608 points, 92 comments)
  45. Coolsource (595 points, 116 comments)
  46. Peter__R (589 points, 43 comments)
  47. timepad (570 points, 62 comments)
  48. Rawlsdeep (564 points, 109 comments)
  49. themgp (560 points, 46 comments)
  50. ForkiusMaximus (558 points, 89 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. Dear Theymos, you divided the Bitcoin community. Not Roger, not Gavin, not Mike. It was you. And dear Blockstream and Core team, you helped, not calling out the abhorrent censorship, the unforgivable manipulation, unbecoming of supposed cypherpunks. Or of any decent, civil persons. by parban333 (566 points, 87 comments)
  2. "One miner loses $12k from BU bug, some Core devs scream. Users pay millions in excessive tx fees over the last year "meh, not a priority" by Egon_1 (529 points, 262 comments)
  3. Charlie Shrem on Twitter: "If we don't implement bigger blocks ASAP, Paypal will be cheaper than #bitcoin. I already pay a few dollars per tx. Stop hindering growth." by sandakersmann (472 points, 254 comments)
  4. nullc disputes that Satoshi Nakamoto left Gavin in control of Bitcoin, asks for citation, then disappears after such citation is clearly provided. greg maxwell is blatantly a toxic troll and an enemy of Satoshi's Bitcoin. by parban333 (400 points, 207 comments)
  5. The debate is not "SHOULD THE BLOCKSIZE BE 1MB VERSUS 1.7MB?". The debate is: "WHO SHOULD DECIDE THE BLOCKSIZE?" (1) Should an obsolete temporary anti-spam hack freeze blocks at 1MB? (2) Should a centralized dev team soft-fork the blocksize to 1.7MB? (3) OR SHOULD THE MARKET DECIDE THE BLOCKSIZE? by ydtm (354 points, 116 comments)
  6. LOL - /bitcoin user claims that people aren't being actively silenced; is actively silenced. by BeijingBitcoins (307 points, 142 comments)
  7. Massive censorship on "/bitcoin" continues by BitcoinIsTehFuture (296 points, 123 comments)
  8. Charlie Shrem on Twitter: "You can talk about anything in BTC and it won't be auto deleted" by BitcoinXio (291 points, 69 comments)
  9. Bitcoin Unlimited blocks exceed Core for first time, 232 vs. 231 of last 1,000 by DNVirtual (282 points, 84 comments)
  10. As relevant as it's always been by iopq (276 points, 15 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 151 points: nicebtc's comment in "One miner loses $12k from BU bug, some Core devs scream. Users pay millions in excessive tx fees over the last year "meh, not a priority"
  2. 123 points: 1DrK44np3gMKuvcGeFVv's comment in "One miner loses $12k from BU bug, some Core devs scream. Users pay millions in excessive tx fees over the last year "meh, not a priority"
  3. 117 points: cryptovessel's comment in nullc disputes that Satoshi Nakamoto left Gavin in control of Bitcoin, asks for citation, then disappears after such citation is clearly provided. greg maxwell is blatantly a toxic troll and an enemy of Satoshi's Bitcoin.
  4. 117 points: seweso's comment in Roger Ver banned for doxing after posting the same thread Prohashing was banned for.
  5. 113 points: BitcoinIsTehFuture's comment in Dear Theymos, you divided the Bitcoin community. Not Roger, not Gavin, not Mike. It was you. And dear Blockstream and Core team, you helped, not calling out the abhorrent censorship, the unforgivable manipulation, unbecoming of supposed cypherpunks. Or of any decent, civil persons.
  6. 106 points: MagmaHindenburg's comment in bitcoin.com loses 13.2BTC trying to fork the network: Untested and buggy BU creates an oversized block, Many BU node banned, the HF fails • /Bitcoin
  7. 98 points: lon102guy's comment in bitcoin.com loses 13.2BTC trying to fork the network: Untested and buggy BU creates an oversized block, Many BU node banned, the HF fails • /Bitcoin
  8. 97 points: bigboi2468's comment in contentious forks vs incremental progress
  9. 92 points: vbuterin's comment in [Mark Friedenbach] There is a reason we are generally up in arms about "abusive" data-on-blockchain proposals: it is because we see the potential of this tech!
  10. 89 points: Peter__R's comment in contentious forks vs incremental progress
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EB133 – Pascal and Julien Hamonic: Applying the Mechanisms of Thermoregulation to Cryptocurrencies TGIF! Live Bitcoin Analysis and Trading - Interviews - Live at Epicenter SF Blockchain Week 2019! EB60 - Robert Sams: Bitcoin, Volatility and the Search for a Stable Cryptocurrency TEEKA TIWARI: The Final 5 Coins to $5 Million  Bitcoin (BTC) Price Gearing Up for Major Move Is Mining Bitcoin Still Profitable in 2020? - YouTube

Epicenter Bitcoin is a show about the technologies, projects & startups driving decentralization and the global cryptocurrency revolution. Every week, hosts Brian Fabian Crain and Sébastien Couture talk to some of the most influential people in the cryptocurrency space about their projects and get their perspectives on recent events. Charlie Shrem learned of Bitcoin in an IRC chat in 2011 and quickly became one of the industry’s first builders and evangelists Charlie Shrem is a legend in the cryptocurrency space. In an ... So there’s tree branches, so one branch is things that are trying to be money or stores of value. Bitcoin, Bitcoin Cash. Second is, second path could be smart contract, native tokens like Ether, Neo. One of these could become store of value. And the third branch is perhaps people do succeed in building a block one resistance like the stablecoin. Over the past 10 years, bitcoin’s growth in acceptance and value has kept rising and the currency has shown its resilience over many peaks and troughs throughout its short lifetime. Epicenter – Stocks with Uncommon Value During Uncommon Times COVID-19 UPDATE: Surprisingly, no "payback" in daily cases which come in at 30,059, -8,146 vs 7D ago. NYC opens for "indoor dining" --> big deal

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EB133 – Pascal and Julien Hamonic: Applying the Mechanisms of Thermoregulation to Cryptocurrencies

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